Saturday, January 1, 2011

XLIII - January 2011

 
 A new year dawns and with it once again a chance to do better -- to love our neighbors, to care for our planet, to slow down and pay attention, to be thankful for our blessings . . .


Do you make resolutions? I don't -- not formal one. But if I did, it might be this:


Practice random acts of kindness
And senseless acts of beauty.


Reading appears to be alive and well, whether with paper and ink books or one of the various electronic alternative.  I did recent posts on the books I got for Christmas and heard back from many of the readers of my daily blog about their reading.
Martin in England is downloading classics– free from the Gutenberg Project -- to his new Kindle.

Pat in east TN has a new Kindle too and is reading The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society and is looking forward to reading Heartbroke Bay and Mountain Born (which I talked about HERE.) 

Crafty Green Poet in Scotland is currently reading Ian McEwan's Atonement; The End of Oil by Paul Roberts and Staying Alive, a brilliant poetry anthology edited by Neil Astley.

Brian Miller is reading Never Let Me Go which is fascinating...and rereading some poetry...by Saul Williams and the New York cafe poets . . .

Louise in NY state said... I've got some old L.M. Montgomery books, that I missed growing up, on my Kindle that I'm making my way through. They're good, but Anne Shirley is definitely her greatest heroine. 

 Star in England is reading The Help by Kathryn Stockett and is loving it.
 
Helen T in SC said... On my Nook I'm reading C.J. Sansom's Dissolution. At a Barnes and Noble after-Christmas sale I bought "Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter" by Tom Franklin. Last night I went to an Inklings exhibit at Greenville Library. I was thrilled to be in the same room with Dorothy L. Sayers autograph, hence her fingerprints. 

Tipper in NC said...  During my snowy days-I've put away a few books: Cataloochee by Wayne Caldwell, U is for Undertow by Sue Grafton, Made in the USA and Shoot The Moon both by Billie Letts. 

Darla said... I've added Red Lily to my wish list. I'm finally reading The Secret Life of Plants (been meaning to for literally years), as well as The Home and The World by Rabindranath Tagore, and Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramhansa Yogananda.
 
Vagabonde said... Books and more books – they make the best presents. You received some nice ones and I did too. I pictured several of them (not all) on my new post. If you click on the picture you will see that I received Art’s Blood from a favorite writer given to me by my daughter from California.. I have started Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese It is no.1 on the Independent Booksellers fiction

Bouncin' Barb said... I'm in the middle of The Girl Who Played With Fire

Hélène GLEHEN in France said.. I am reading: Walden ou la vie dans les bois by Henry David Thoreau, haïkus by Basho and my best "whodunit" 

jennyfreckles in England said... I'm reading....The Day of Small Things - about five chapters in and I'm seriously hooked..

Donna D. reports reading THE HELP, SOMEONE KNOWS MY NAME,THE MAGICIAN'S ELEPHANT [juvenile] and says they're all well worth reading.
Donna also says  --PACKING FOR MARS took a back seat to A DAY OF SMALL THINGS and I need to get back to it, although I've just begun THE PIG DID IT, which seems to have promise.

Many thanks to all of you for your support and friendship in the past year. I am buckling down to a new book and hope to be able to tell you more soon. 

The happiest of New Years to all of you!





 
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3 comments:

Carol said...

Loved the report Vicki! HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!!!

Anonymous said...

That was some snowy month, wasn't it? What about that old log cabin---is it the original building on your property?

I'm really looking forward to hearing about your new book. I just finished "In the Wood," "The God of Animals," and "The Secret River."

May this year bring great inspiration to all artists!

Deana the Queena

Vicki Lane said...

Deana -- yes it is -- supposedly the first built on Anderson Branch. It's about 150 years old.